Dates and Location

National Maritime Day

Each year on May 22 our country celebrates National Maritime Day.

The United States has always been and will always be a great maritime nation. From our origins as 13 British colonies, through every period of peace and conflict since, the U.S. Merchant Marine has been a pillar in this country’s foundation of prosperity and security. They power the world’s largest economy and strengthen our ties with trading partners around the world, all while supporting our military forces by shipping troops and supplies wherever they need to go.

Maritime Day is a time-honored tradition that recognizes one of our country’s most important industries. This year, ceremonies and celebrations throughout the country will recognized Maritime Day and the people our maritime nation depends on.

Here in Washington, DC, our national ceremony details are as follows:

Tuesday 22 May, 2018 

10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

U.S. Department of Transportation

200 New Jersey Ave. SE Washington D.C. 20590                                                                             

Admittance to the event is by RSVP only and seating is limited, so please RSVP early at MaritimeDay@dot.gov but no later than May 15, 2018.

 

Please consider the use of public transportation for this event.

Read More...

Date of Speech: MAY 17, 2018

 REMARKS

MARK H. BUZBY

MARITIME ADMINISTRATOR

PROPELLER CLUB SAN DIEGO
NATIONAL MARITIME DAY EVENT

TOM HAMS LIGHT HOUSE
SAN DIEGO, CA

MAY 17, 2018

11:00AM – 12:00 PM

 

Thank you for having me for today’s celebration of National Maritime Day here in San Diego.  Always nice to be back in this seafaring town.

I’m honored to be joining so many maritime leaders and friends from our industry – my old shipmate Dave Thomas, vice president and general manager of BAE Systems San Diego Ship Repair, and his team.

Commander Don Montoro of the U.S. Coast Guard in San Diego; Kevin Graney, President of NASSCO, and your team;  Rafael Castellanos, chairman of the Port of San Diego; San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer and councilmember David Alvarez; and all of the other maritime business leaders and friends in attendance.

I had a great tour of the 10th Avenue Marine Terminal earlier this morning, and after lunch I’ll be kicking steel over at bae and at NASSCO. I look forward to that.

MARAD has partnered and collaborated with San Diego for many years, and part of the reason I wanted to visit the 10th Ave Terminal was to see how the $10 million Tiger Grant was going to be applied to rehabilitate the terminal.

By the way, Tiger is now called “BUILD” which stands for “Better Utilizing Investments to Leverage Development.”  I can report that another $1.5 billion is being awarded this year, a portion of which will be committed to port upgrades and expansions.

This region is a model for the modern maritime industry, and I’m proud to be joining you to celebrate national maritime day — a day when we have the privilege to honor America mariners who have served the U.S. admirably in times of peace and war. Many of those have made the ultimate sacrifice for our nation.
Today…  it’s my privilege to recognize the many dedicated seafaring men and women of the U.S. merchant marine who have fueled the economy of the united states of America . . . And supported our growth as a nation for more than 240 years.

By delivering supplies and equipment to our military forces overseas, and commercial cargoes here at home and to other nations, these mariners have helped to sustain the American way of life.
In ways I can’t possibly recount, they have contributed to our society’s security and prosperity. So we owe a great debt to our American mariners – and that includes the many thousands presently employed in oceangoing, great lakes, inland river, and marine-related shore side jobs here stateside and around the world.

You know, we often forget that our nation began with a voyage:  a native American paddling his canoe – the very first Jones Act vessel!  An international ocean voyage intended to grow maritime trade occurred years later… and it was financed by maritime trade.

That early seagoing enterprise transformed an unexplored continent into the most powerful nation on earth.

Through shipping… our country grew in power and influence, gained its independence and ushered in a new, democratic way of life for humankind.

Our founders recognized our enormous waterborne resources – three ocean coastlines, the world’s largest freshwater lakes to our north, and thousands of miles of inland rivers and waterways traversing the heartland – and they wisely linked our nation’s future to growing our maritime strength.

Everything that the maritime industry meant 200 years ago… it still means today.

Through the years the industry has undergone many changes, but one thing hasn’t changed.

During times of domestic or international emergency, America’s merchant mariners are among the first to be called to action to help those in need, both at home and abroad.

We saw that play out vividly during last summer’s hurricane season when America mariners in U.S.-built ships provided the vast majority of the cargo lift – 24 ships – to service the hard-hit island of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

Hats off to Jones Act carriers Crowley, Tote, Trailerbridge and North America for their tremendous response.  And they are still there today. And special shout out to pasha for sending the “horizon spirit” around from this coast to assist in the relief effort.

Our mariner’s efforts have been absolutely essential to our national defense, from the revolutionary war on to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan… and every conflict in between.

Today, as we honor maritime’s proud past… We look expectantly to the future– like always, a future “full and down” with challenges.

Many of you may have read my recent testimony before Congress where I expressed my grave concerns about our ability today to meet the nation’s sealift requirements for a prolonged major overseas engagement.

Shrinking numbers of vessels in the U.S. merchant marine, and the resulting decline in our pool of qualified mariners, puts us on the edge of not having enough people to support the world’s most powerful military that we’re preparing to recapitalize.
The simple formula is this: to have enough U.S. ships and mariners to serve our nation’s sealift and sustainment requirements in times of crisis, we need a healthy peacetime maritime industry with enough ships and mariners to meet the crisis demand.   And the key element that determines ship numbers and mariner numbers is cargo.

Today the U.S.-flag fleet in international trade currently carries less than 2 percent of our annual foreign trade.

The U.S.-flag presence in international commercial trade is at an historic low with only 81 ships, which means the pool of qualified mariners needed to crew a prolonged sealift mobilization is also at an historic low. MARAD recently estimated a shortfall of 1,800 mariners for a long term sealift effort.
My team and i have been working closely with us transportation command, military sealift command, the coast guard, and our commercial partners to address these issues.

There are no silver bullets or easy answers, but to meet our national security objectives, i have three tools at my disposal — the Maritime Security Program, or MSP, Cargo Preference, and the Jones Act.

The MSP has been fully authorized for the remainder of fiscal year 2018, which is great news.  The program pays a stipend to 60 of the 81 internationally trading ships that I mentioned earlier.  Absolutely critical program.
And we continue to advocate for robust Cargo Preference levels to help U.S.-flag commercial shipping companies compete and employ an adequate pool of qualified mariners.

We are up on Capitol Hill regularly advocating for the strongest possible Cargo Preference quotas.

I alluded to the Jones Act earlier when talking about hurricane relief.  Here is another program essential to the health of the U.S. maritime industry.   Remember I just spoke about the 81 internationally trading vessels under the U.S. flag?  Well, of the 38,000 or so Jones Act vessels, 100 of them are large oceangoing ships.  That means that those ships provide the majority of the employment pool for unlimited license mariners.

Take away the Jones Act and you have just about cut the active mariner pool in half.   It would also have a devastating effect on domestic shipyards, the supply chains that support them, and vessel operators.   It would be an immediate threat to national defense.

It all comes back to cargo, and finding more opportunities for our ships to carry it.  More ships to carry more cargo equates to more jobs…and more resilience in our sealift capability.

Things aren’t all doom and gloom though!

Between hurricanes Harvey and Maria, MARAD dispatched four of our school ships to locations in Texas, Florida, and the Caribbean, including Puerto Rico, providing over 35,000 berthing nights and 52,000 meals to first responders.  They demonstrated the importance of having ships ready to respond on short notice for humanitarian assistance and disaster response.
A few months later, we saw Congress add $300 million to the MARAD budget, full funding for this country’s first purpose-built training vessel: which we call the National Security Multi-Mission Vessel. And it’s going to be built in a U.S. shipyard, and there will very likely be more than one.
That plus up was part of the largest budget in MARAD’s history. At $979.6 million for fiscal year 2018, it’s nearly a half-a-billion-dollar increase over our 2017 budget.

Congress also provided $45 million in funding for capital improvements at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy – an increase of $34 million over FY 2017. That will allow us to accelerate many needed repairs and building replacements.  The six state maritime academies received a total of $32 million for a range of important programs — an increase of $3 million over FY 2017.

These funds will go toward training the young mariners who will serve our military, strengthen our national security, crew our commercial shipping industry and serve the U.S. merchant marine in the years ahead.

Another $289.3 million came to MARAD from the Department of Defense in FY 2018 to maintain the 46 vessels in our ready reserve force, and begin service-life extensions for some.

The average age of this fleet is 43 years old, and 23 of the 46 are steam driven.  Its time to recapitalize this capability.

And in addition to the newly-named “BUILD” grants I mentioned earlier, another $20 million is available in Small Shipyard Grants this year, and we received $7 million for the marine highway grant programs. The notice of funding opportunity should be out before summer on that one.
Major opportunities for innovation and a healthier, more competitive U.S. maritime industry, will probably come through technology.
MARAD has some important developments underway in this area. I have put my deputy administrator – Dick Balzano (Maine Maritime grad) in charge of MARAD’s new research and development program.

His group will be studying and assessing new technologies such as autonomous vessels and cyber-security related innovations, among others.

So things are happening, and MARAD is working with industry and our federal partners to ensure that this new frontier compliments and enhances our industry.

Work is also continuing on our National Maritime Transportation Strategy – which provides a strategic platform for our industry’s resurgence. We view it as our blueprint for the future. It was drafted under previous Administrator Chip Jaenichen’s watch, but I support it and intend to push it forward.

It will help our nation’s maritime leaders prepare for the predicted increased freight flows driven by an increasing population… and guide us in stimulating the modernization, and expansion, of our merchant marine. I want to see it adopted because i believe it can be a steering star for our way ahead. So stay tuned on that.

So, yes, we are working through an extended season of significant challenges in the maritime industry but I think there is also lot to be upbeat on Maritime Day this year.

When it’s all said and done – when we’ve concluded all of our discussions about ships and ports and cargo and intermodal connectivity — the real story is that there are “people” behind those great ships. There are dedicated, highly skilled mariners making the merchant marine work for this nation… keeping the industry afloat, and… on occasion, paying the ultimate price.

In celebrating and saluting these fine men and women – past, present, and future – i commend them for consistently going far beyond the call of duty.

 

Just last week, I awarded merchant marine Meritorious Service medals to two Maryland pilots, and three launch operators who set out in hurricane force conditions off the Virginia capes to bring a carnival cruise lines ship into the bay that was trying to evade the heavy weather.  20-foot seas and 80 knots of wind – pretty sporty.

But they got the job done safely.

This National Maritime Day observance is fitting tribute to those who have served our nation honorably for more than 200 years. To all of you I say congratulations… and thank you!

Read More...

Dates and Location
From: May 22, 2017 10:00am
To: May 22, 2017 12:00pm
Location: West Atrium

 The U.S. Department of Transportation

Maritime Administration

Invites you to

Save the Date

Monday, May 22, 2017

 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

for the

National Maritime Day Celebration

at the

U.S. Department of Transportation

1200 New Jersey Ave. SE Washington D.C. 20590

In 1933, Congress declared National Maritime Day to commemorate the American steamship Savannah’s voyage from the United States to England, marking the first successful crossing of the Atlantic Ocean with steam propulsion. During World War II more than 250,000 members of the American Merchant Marine served their country, with more than 6,700 giving their lives, hundreds being detained as prisoners of war and more than 800 U.S. merchant ships being sunk or damaged.

Admittance to the event is by RSVP only and seating is limited, so please RSVP early at MaritimeDay@dot.gov but no later than May 15, 2017.

Please consider the use of public transportation for this event.

Read More...

National Maritime Day

Each year on May 22 our country celebrates National Maritime Day.

The United States has always been and will always be a great maritime nation. From our origins as 13 British colonies, through every period of peace and conflict since, the Merchant Marine has been a pillar in this country’s foundation of prosperity and security. They power the world’s largest economy and strengthen our ties with trading partners around the world, all while supporting our military forces by shipping troops and supplies wherever they need to go.

In 1933, Congress declared National Maritime Day to commemorate the American steamship Savannah’s voyage from the United States to England, marking the first successful crossing of the Atlantic Ocean with steam propulsion. During World War II more than 250,000 members of the American Merchant Marine served their country, with more than 6,700 giving their lives, hundreds being detained as prisoners of war and more than 800 U.S. merchant ships being sunk or damaged.

Maritime Day is a time-honored tradition that recognizes one of our country’s most important industries. Ceremonies and celebrations throughout the country will recognized Maritime Day and the people our maritime nation depends on.

 

Maritime Administration 2018 National Maritime Day Celebration Video

Read More...

   
News Release #: MARAD 04-18
Date: Oct 11, 2018
Contact: MARAD Office of Public Affairs
Contact Phone: Tel.:  (202) 366-5807

Maritime Administration Issues Request for Proposal

Vessel Construction Manager Will Deliver National Security Multi-Mission Vessel

WASHINGTON – Today, the Maritime Administration (MARAD) released a Request for Proposal (RFP) to solicit for a Vessel Construction Manager (VCM) to deliver a new class of training ships referred to as a National Security Multi-Mission Vessel (NSMV).  The VCM selected by MARAD will contract with a qualified shipyard to ensure that commercial best practices are utilized in delivering the NSMV on time and on budget.

“A new multi-mission vessel built by an American Shipyard will not only create new jobs, but help train the next generation of American mariners and contribute to disaster relief,” said U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine L. Chao.

The 2017 National Defense Authorization Act directed MARAD to “provide for an entity other than the Maritime Administration to contract for the construction of the NSMV.”  This procurement process leverages existing marketplace expertise, targeting companies experienced in the production of innovative U.S.-built ships.

“The U.S. shipbuilding and repair industry is vital to the economic strength and security of our nation,” added Maritime Administrator Mark H. Buzby, “and this project will demonstrate that American shipbuilding remains the global standard of excellence.”

The NSMV will help to sustain world-class, U.S. maritime training operations at the State Maritime Academies by equipping young American mariners with a modern and adaptable training platform.  The NSMV will feature numerous instructional spaces, eight classrooms, a full training bridge, labs, and an auditorium.  It will have space for up to 600 cadets to train in a first-rate maritime academic environment at sea.

In addition to serving as an educational platform, the NSMV will also be available to support federal government efforts in response to national and international disasters, such as hurricanes and earthquakes.  In this role, the NSMV will be equipped to support major federal relief and response efforts, providing hospital facilities, a helicopter landing pad, and berthing for up to 1,000 first responders and recovery workers.  The NSMV’s roll-on/roll-off ramp and a crane to facilitate container storage capabilities will also enable it to provide critical supplies to damaged port facilities.

The economic benefit of this coastwise-endorsed training vessel extends beyond academics – and the replacement of the nation’s aging “training ship” fleet – to the thousands of men and women in the shipbuilding and repair industry.  These skilled workers at U.S. shipyards and repair facilities add billions to the economy annually, reflecting the best of American maritime engineering and ingenuity.  The first NSMV is expected to be delivered to the Maritime Administration in 2022.

The Request For Proposal can be found at the following link: MARAD NSMV Vessel Construction Management (VCM)

###

Read More...

Date of Speech: Aug 15, 2018

 REMARKS AS PREPARED

MARK H. BUZBY
MARITIME ADMINISTRATOR

“NORTH AMERICAN MARITIME MINISTRIES ASSN.” ANNUAL CONFERENCE
SEAFARERS WELFARE

692 MARITIME BLVD.
BALTIMORE, MD

AUG. 15, 2018
10:45 – 12:15


Thank you Jason. It’s great to be here with you today, and joining with Captain Manning and Lyn to discuss seaman’s welfare.

First let me just say thank you all for the outstanding work you do on behalf of the maritime industry and seafarers around the world. As a seafarer myself, we owe you all a great debt.

I am very honored to be here, because your mission is near and dear to my heart: you take care of mariners!

In that respect we have a very common focus. The command philosophy that I have lived by since commanding my first ship over 20 years ago has three simple tenants, and the first one of those is: “Take care of your people first.”

So I think we see eye to eye there.

And in case you are wondering, the other two tenants of my command philosophy are: “Be a professional” and “Be a good shipmate.”  That’s what I believe, and that is how I’ve run every organization that I have been entrusted to lead – and that includes the Maritime Administration, my ships in the ready reserve force and my midshipmen at Kings Point.

I myself was born a block from the Atlantic Ocean on the Jersey Shore, and the sea has influenced me literally from my first breath.
Growing up, I was fortunate to be surrounded by a strong cadre of male family members and close friends – the kind of people you call “uncle” – who had all served in World War II or Korea.

The majority of them served in the sea services – Navy and marine corps.
They were all god-fearing men and church attendance was what we all did every Sunday morning – St. Andrew’s Lutheran, on the corner of Michigan and Pacific avenues by the sea in Atlantic City, NJ.

Right across the street from the hospital where I was born and right next door to the Dennis Hotel where my family lived.

As a child fishing and boating on the local waters, learning to command    `           my first vessel, I couldn’t wait to grow up and pursue my true destiny. I knew it would involve ships, sailors, and the sea.

What followed was a truly wonderful career that began at Admiral Farragut Academy, progressed to the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, and then off on a 34-year adventure in the Navy, working my way up the chain of command to eventually command some incredible ships and some of the finest shipmates from all walks of life.

And from my earliest days as a midshipman at Kings Point– through my Navy time – and then especially during my last four years at military sealift command, I was in frequent contact with the port chaplains and facilities that are a part of NAMMA. So I know you!

I know that it is well appreciated by this audience that life afloat these days has changed a lot since I started out, back in the 70s.

I think it’s true for both the Navy and especially so for the Merchant Marine side and particularly on internationally trading ships.

There are plenty of reasons for this: smaller crew sizes, longer ship assignment contracts, less in-port time, more personal electronics driving people into their cabins, and in many cases a more culturally or ethnically diverse crew. I’m sure that you can add some additional factors in there.

The net result is – in my view – going to sea has grown more stressful and lonely than it used to be. I’m sure that drives a lot of people out of the maritime industry – if they even can leave the industry.  For some, that’s just not an option – they’ve ‘gotta’ gut it out.  That impacts quality of life in a whole lot of negative ways.

I know that for years, surveys of sailors in the Navy routinely showed that the greatest “dissatisfier” was separation from family and friends.
All this concerns me a lot for a couple of reasons.  I don’t like seeing an industry that I grew up in and have strong ties with become a place to be avoided. We are a maritime nation – seafaring is part of our nation’s history. Attracting and retaining new mariners is becoming increasing challenging.

The other issue is that I am already in a pretty significant personnel shortage situation.

To execute one of my statutory missions of providing emergency surge sealift for our nation’s armed forces, I operate 46 ships in the Ready Reserve Force, maintained in 5-day readiness status in ports around the country – four right here in Baltimore. They have 9-person caretaker crews. We depend on these ships to move our armed forces where they are needed.

Earlier this year, I testified before Congress that we are about 1800 deep-sea unlimited tonnage mariners short of the number needed to meet our nation’s sealift requirements. That’s a national security impact right now. I can just barely fully man those 46 ships – but sustaining it is a problem.

So I care a lot about the health and well-being of our mariner workforce – and I know you do too – in an even more hands on kind of way. Because that’s what NAMMA and its members are all about.

I also know that not only do you care about U.S. mariners, but just as importantly for foreign mariners arriving in the U.S.as well. Given the port security restrictions we operate under in this post-911 world, it can be very difficult if not impossible for some crews to leave the ship.

We know for certain that “NAMMA” serves as a virtual U.S. ambassadorship to the foreign sailors that come into U.S. ports.

Using your “Wi-Fi” or email and phone to call home and talk to a husband, wife, loved one, friend or family member, can make a huge difference to a seafarer’s mental state.

And as we have seen in the not so recent past, it is not uncommon these days for unscrupulous owners to abandon ships and crews leaving them without pay, or subsistence, or even a means to go home.  The role you play in helping those poor souls work through their situations is unparalleled.

It still amazes me that in 2018, ship abandonments still occur – it’s incredible.
I can tell you that we at MARAD are grateful for the selfless service you provide to seafarers of all nationalities.

We encourage and support programs of “NAMMA” members that work to help our mariner’s physical, mental, spiritual well-being. You are our partner in that very important endeavor, and I’m here to tell you that we are yours as well.

Your chaplains, your programs, your centers, have made an enormous difference in the lives of countless thousands of homesick seafarers that many of you here today – along with your dedicated fellow caregivers — have helped and comforted through the years.

Thank you for everything you do – both for those things we can see and those we cannot, in the hearts and minds of our seafarers. I salute you. Stay the course and keep up the good work.

God bless you all.

Read More...

   
News Release #: MARAD 03-18
Date: Aug 08, 2018
Contact: MARAD Public Affairs
Contact Phone: 202-366-5807

Maritime Administration Awards $4.8 Million in Grants

for Marine Highway Projects Throughout the U.S.

WASHINGTON- Today, U.S. Department of Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao announced $4,872,000 in grants to six Marine Highway projects. The funding, provided by the Maritime Administration’s (MARAD) Marine Highway program, will help enhance existing marine highways serving ports in Louisiana, Virginia, New York, and Connecticut, and support the development of new container-on-barge services in Kentucky and Rhode Island.

“Strengthening the country’s waterways and domestic seaports stimulates economic growth, reduces congestion and increases the efficiency of our national freight transportation system,” said Secretary of Transportation Elaine L. Chao.

The Marine Highway Program supports the expanded use of navigable waterways to relieve landside congestion, provide new transportation options, and generate other public benefits by increasing the efficiency of the surface transportation system. The program works with public and private stakeholders to achieve these goals.

“These marine highway grants will help expand freight movement on the water and modernize our inland ports and waterways,” said Maritime Administrator Mark Buzby.

Marine Highways provide new modal choices to cargo shippers, which reduces transportation costs while providing the public benefits of reduced road maintenance costs and improved safety. Expanding the use of our waterways supports jobs at U.S. ports and shipyards, and marine highway services also benefit national security by providing an alternate mode of transportation and adding to our strategic sealift resources.

Projects receiving grant funding are:

Port of Baton Rouge and Port of New Orleans Container-on-Barge (awarded $2,507,200)

The grant will be used to purchase marine terminal and handling equipment for efficient loading and unloading of container-on-barge operations in New Orleans. The existing service, which operates on a regular, reliable schedule, is designed to relocate empty containers in Memphis to meet export customer demand in Baton Rouge. This grant will allow the service to expand to the New Orleans France Road terminal and will allow northbound containers to be offloaded as far north as Memphis, TN.

Davisville/Brooklyn/Newark Container-on-Barge Service (awarded $855,200)

Sponsored by the Quonset Development Corporation, this service will run between Brooklyn, NY, Newark, NJ and the Port of Davisville in Rhode Island. The service will include a dedicated run twice a week utilizing one 800-TEU capacity deck barge and will remove approximately 83,200 containers and 14,976,000 vehicular miles annually from the road. It will also relieve landside congestion and lower transportation costs for shippers while providing additional economic opportunities regionally.

James River Expansion Project on the M-64 (awarded $456,000)

Sponsored by the Port of Virginia, this regularly scheduled service operates three times a week between terminals in Hampton Roads, and the Richmond Marine Terminal.  The grant will allow the service to continue expanding by increasing freight handling capacity at the Richmond Marine Terminal, enabling it to provide a more efficient level of service.

New York Harbor Container and Trailer-on-Barge Service (awarded $298,423)

Sponsored by the New York City Economic Development Corporation, the grant will assist with funding a planning study to look at how marine highway services can be expanded throughout the Northeast region from New York Harbor to other points. Since many of the terminals at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey are reaching capacity; the study will provide the data necessary to establish the business case to support shipping container movement by barge between terminals and beyond. Services derived from this study could reduce landside congestion, provide greater market access and improve terminal capacity and efficiency. 

Cross Sound Enhancement Project (awarded $503,250)

Sponsored by the Connecticut Port Authority, this grant will support the improvement of the Cross-Sound Ferry by expanding the dock and supporting infrastructure. The project will focus on maintaining and improving operational safety and efficiency. The grants funding will be utilized for shoreside infrastructure improvements and more efficient direction of vehicular traffic.

Paducah-McCracken Riverport Container-on-Barge Service (awarded $251,927)

Sponsored by the Paducah-McCracken County Riverport Authority, the grant funding will be applied to an 18-month demonstration of container-on-barge services that would stretch across three states and three marine highways. Specifically, the funds would be utilized for leasing and/or purchase of shoreside container handling equipment.

###

Read More...

   
MARAD #07-18
Jul 24, 2018

 

News Release: #07-18

Date: July 24, 2018

Contact:  MARAD Public Affairs

Tel:  202-366-5807

 

Maritime Administration Announces More Than

 $20 Million in Grants for U.S. Small Shipyards

 

WASHINGTON- The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration (MARAD) today awarded more than $20 million in grants to support capital improvements at 29 U.S. small shipyards as a part of its Small Shipyard Grant program. MARAD’s Small Shipyard grant funding supports capital improvements that foster increased efficiency and economic growth.

“These grants are an investment in our country’s small shipyards and will help create good jobs for America’s workers,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao.

America’s shipyards support more than 400,000 jobs and contribute more than $37 billion in Gross Domestic Product (GDP) to the nation’s economy. Small shipyards vary in size, but have under 1,200 production employees to be eligible for grant awards. They play a significant role in our country’s maritime sector, contributing to our nation’s economy, supporting national security, maintaining critical infrastructure, and creating employment opportunities for working families and in small communities.

“By supporting small shipyards, we are investing in the maritime infrastructure of the country,” said Maritime Administrator Mark H. Buzby.

Since 2008, MARAD’s Small Shipyard Grant Program has awarded over $183 million to more than 180 small shipyards. These grants help fund the upgrades and expansions to empower this critical industry, allowing them to compete more effectively in a rapidly changing global marketplace. By providing the capital that will let shipyards increase their repair and production footprints these grants are helping to create more jobs throughout the country.

 

A complete list of grant recipients is below:

Catalyst Marine Engineering, Inc. in Seward, AK was awarded $400,097 to support the purchase of a Mach 500 water jet cutting system.

Master Boat Builders, Inc. in Bayou La Batre, AL was awarded $1,332,607 to support the purchase of a 182-ton capacity crawler, 55-ton mobile crane and a 30-ton rough terrain crane.

Marine Group Boat Works, LLC in Chula Vista, CA was awarded $392,037 to support the purchase of a CNC plasma table, 125-foot boom lift and a 33,000-pound forklift.

Patti Marine Enterprise, Inc. in Pensacola, FL was awarded $449,231 to support the purchase of a plasma cutting machine and iron worker.

Glasstech Corp. in Miami, FL was awarded $715,688 to support the purchase of a 165-ton marine travelift and a 65-ton vessel transporter.

Pacific Shipyards International in Honolulu, HI was awarded $731,159 in support of the purchase of a spray paint sandblast booth, hydraulic press with tooling, universal valve tester package with console and tooling, and four base plate mounted jibs.

National Maintenance and Repair, Inc. in Hartford, IL was awarded $217,538 to support the purchase of a plasma cutting system.

James Marine, Inc. dba Walker Boat Yard of Paducah, KY was awarded $1,125,000 to support the purchase of an 80-ton rough terrain crane.

Gravois Aluminum Boats, LLC in Jeanerette, LA was awarded $451,860 to support the purchase of an 80-ton rough terrain crane and welding equipment.

Bollinger Shipyards, Lockport LLC in Lockport, LA was awarded $521,753 to support the purchase of a lathe mill multi-task machine and a Python X Robotics CNC plasma cutting structural fabrication system.

Chesapeake Shipbuilding Corp. of Salisbury, MD was awarded $492,047 to support the purchase of four extending boom forklifts, a mobile crane and construction of larger mobile launching ways.

Washburn & Doughty Associates, Inc. in West Boothbay, ME was awarded $618,750 to support the purchase of robotic welding machines and a CNC lathe.

Front Street Shipyard in Belfast, ME was awarded $667,028 to support the purchase of a water jet cutting machine.

North Shore Marine Terminal & Logistics, Inc. in Escanaba, MI was awarded $713,468 in support of the modernization, safety and uptime improvements of material cutting and handling equipment.

SCF Services, Inc. in St. Louis, MO was awarded $489,917 in support of the purchase of a 110-ton crawler crane and employee skills training.

United States Marine, Inc. in Gulfport, MS was awarded $313,270 in support of the establishment of a lamination apprentice program and the purchase of a CNC core cutting machine and paint booth.

Jarrett Bay Boatworks, Inc. in Beaufort, NC was awarded $1,000,000 to support the purchase of a 300-ton marine travelift.

Bayonne Drydock and Repair Corp. in Bayonne, NJ was awarded $1,081,950 in support of the purchase of a CNC plasma table, brake press, plate roll, welding machines, iron worker, graving dock upgrades and hydroblast equipment.

Dorchester Shipyard, Inc. in Dorchester, NJ was awarded $232,585 in support of the purchase of two electric air compressor systems and electrical upgrades in the shipyard.

Ironhead Marine Inc. in Toledo, OH was awarded $768,500 to support the purchase of a 150-ton off-road crane.

Sause Bros. Inc. dba Southern Oregon Marine, Inc. in Coos Bay, OR was awarded $642,329 in support of the purchase of a mobile rough terrain crane, air compressors and a self-contained fabricated paint management system.

Metal Trades, Inc. in Hollywood, SC was awarded $520,167 to support the purchase of a kinetic heavy duty cutting and drilling machine.

Gulf Copper Dry Dock & Rig Repair in Galveston, TX was awarded $1,296,820 to support the construction of a 4,500-ton dry dock.

Glendale Boat Works, Inc. in Channelview, TX was awarded $1,064,654 to support the purchase of a 400-ton marine travelift.

Marine Hydraulics International, Inc. in Norfolk, VA was awarded $505,617 to support to the purchase of ten forklifts.

Snow and Company, Inc.  in Seattle, WA was awarded $67,511 to support the purchase of a Scotchman iron worker, Preston Eastin 2-axis weld positioner, engraving machine and four new welding machines.

Ice Floe, LLC dba Nichols Brother Boat Builders in Freeland, WA was awarded $1,312,500 to support the purchase of a 250-ton lattice boom crawler crane.

Fincantieri Marine Group LLC dba Fincantieri Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay, WI was awarded $1,401,061 in support of the purchase and installation of four 50-ton overhead cranes.

Fraser Shipyard, Inc. in Superior, WI was awarded $500,738 to support the purchase of two self-propelled modular transporters and a high capacity forklift.

###

Read More...

   

 

News Release: #07-18

Date: July 24, 2018

Contact:  MARAD Public Affairs

Tel:  202-366-5807

 

Maritime Administration Announces More Than

 $20 Million in Grants for U.S. Small Shipyards

 

WASHINGTON- The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration (MARAD) today awarded more than $20 million in grants to support capital improvements at 29 U.S. small shipyards as a part of its Small Shipyard Grant program. MARAD’s Small Shipyard grant funding supports capital improvements that foster increased efficiency and economic growth.

“These grants are an investment in our country’s small shipyards and will help create good jobs for America’s workers,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao.

America’s shipyards support more than 400,000 jobs and contribute more than $37 billion in Gross Domestic Product (GDP) to the nation’s economy. Small shipyards vary in size, but have under 1,200 production employees to be eligible for grant awards. They play a significant role in our country’s maritime sector, contributing to our nation’s economy, supporting national security, maintaining critical infrastructure, and creating employment opportunities for working families and in small communities.

“By supporting small shipyards, we are investing in the maritime infrastructure of the country,” said Maritime Administrator Mark H. Buzby.

Since 2008, MARAD’s Small Shipyard Grant Program has awarded over $183 million to more than 180 small shipyards. These grants help fund the upgrades and expansions to empower this critical industry, allowing them to compete more effectively in a rapidly changing global marketplace. By providing the capital that will let shipyards increase their repair and production footprints these grants are helping to create more jobs throughout the country.

 

A complete list of grant recipients is below:

Catalyst Marine Engineering, Inc. in Seward, AK was awarded $400,097 to support the purchase of a Mach 500 water jet cutting system.

Master Boat Builders, Inc. in Bayou La Batre, AL was awarded $1,332,607 to support the purchase of a 182-ton capacity crawler, 55-ton mobile crane and a 30-ton rough terrain crane.

Marine Group Boat Works, LLC in Chula Vista, CA was awarded $392,037 to support the purchase of a CNC plasma table, 125-foot boom lift and a 33,000-pound forklift.

Patti Marine Enterprise, Inc. in Pensacola, FL was awarded $449,231 to support the purchase of a plasma cutting machine and iron worker.

Glasstech Corp. in Miami, FL was awarded $715,688 to support the purchase of a 165-ton marine travelift and a 65-ton vessel transporter.

Pacific Shipyards International in Honolulu, HI was awarded $731,159 in support of the purchase of a spray paint sandblast booth, hydraulic press with tooling, universal valve tester package with console and tooling, and four base plate mounted jibs.

National Maintenance and Repair, Inc. in Hartford, IL was awarded $217,538 to support the purchase of a plasma cutting system.

James Marine, Inc. dba Walker Boat Yard of Paducah, KY was awarded $1,125,000 to support the purchase of an 80-ton rough terrain crane.

Gravois Aluminum Boats, LLC in Jeanerette, LA was awarded $451,860 to support the purchase of an 80-ton rough terrain crane and welding equipment.

Bollinger Shipyards, Lockport LLC in Lockport, LA was awarded $521,753 to support the purchase of a lathe mill multi-task machine and a Python X Robotics CNC plasma cutting structural fabrication system.

Chesapeake Shipbuilding Corp. of Salisbury, MD was awarded $492,047 to support the purchase of four extending boom forklifts, a mobile crane and construction of larger mobile launching ways.

Washburn & Doughty Associates, Inc. in West Boothbay, ME was awarded $618,750 to support the purchase of robotic welding machines and a CNC lathe.

Front Street Shipyard in Belfast, ME was awarded $667,028 to support the purchase of a water jet cutting machine.

North Shore Marine Terminal & Logistics, Inc. in Escanaba, MI was awarded $713,468 in support of the modernization, safety and uptime improvements of material cutting and handling equipment.

SCF Services, Inc. in St. Louis, MO was awarded $489,917 in support of the purchase of a 110-ton crawler crane and employee skills training.

United States Marine, Inc. in Gulfport, MS was awarded $313,270 in support of the establishment of a lamination apprentice program and the purchase of a CNC core cutting machine and paint booth.

Jarrett Bay Boatworks, Inc. in Beaufort, NC was awarded $1,000,000 to support the purchase of a 300-ton marine travelift.

Bayonne Drydock and Repair Corp. in Bayonne, NJ was awarded $1,081,950 in support of the purchase of a CNC plasma table, brake press, plate roll, welding machines, iron worker, graving dock upgrades and hydroblast equipment.

Dorchester Shipyard, Inc. in Dorchester, NJ was awarded $232,585 in support of the purchase of two electric air compressor systems and electrical upgrades in the shipyard.

Ironhead Marine Inc. in Toledo, OH was awarded $768,500 to support the purchase of a 150-ton off-road crane.

Sause Bros. Inc. dba Southern Oregon Marine, Inc. in Coos Bay, OR was awarded $642,329 in support of the purchase of a mobile rough terrain crane, air compressors and a self-contained fabricated paint management system.

Metal Trades, Inc. in Hollywood, SC was awarded $520,167 to support the purchase of a kinetic heavy duty cutting and drilling machine.

Gulf Copper Dry Dock & Rig Repair in Galveston, TX was awarded $1,296,820 to support the construction of a 4,500-ton dry dock.

Glendale Boat Works, Inc. in Channelview, TX was awarded $1,064,654 to support the purchase of a 400-ton marine travelift.

Marine Hydraulics International, Inc. in Norfolk, VA was awarded $505,617 to support to the purchase of ten forklifts.

Snow and Company, Inc.  in Seattle, WA was awarded $67,511 to support the purchase of a Scotchman iron worker, Preston Eastin 2-axis weld positioner, engraving machine and four new welding machines.

Ice Floe, LLC dba Nichols Brother Boat Builders in Freeland, WA was awarded $1,312,500 to support the purchase of a 250-ton lattice boom crawler crane.

Fincantieri Marine Group LLC dba Fincantieri Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay, WI was awarded $1,401,061 in support of the purchase and installation of four 50-ton overhead cranes.

Fraser Shipyard, Inc. in Superior, WI was awarded $500,738 to support the purchase of two self-propelled modular transporters and a high capacity forklift.

###

Read More...

   
News Release #: MARAD #07-18
Date: Jul 24, 2018
Contact: MARAD Public Affairs
Contact Phone: 202-366-5807

WASHINGTON- The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration (MARAD) today awarded more than $20 million in grants to support capital improvements at 29 U.S. small shipyards as a part of its Small Shipyard Grant program. MARAD’s Small Shipyard grant funding supports capital improvements that foster increased efficiency and economic growth.

“These grants are an investment in our country’s small shipyards and will help create good jobs for America’s workers,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao.

America’s shipyards support more than 400,000 jobs and contribute more than $37 billion in Gross Domestic Product (GDP) to the nation’s economy. Small shipyards vary in size, but have under 1,200 production employees to be eligible for grant awards. They play a significant role in our country’s maritime sector, contributing to our nation’s economy, supporting national security, maintaining critical infrastructure, and creating employment opportunities for working families and in small communities.

“By supporting small shipyards, we are investing in the maritime infrastructure of the country,” said Maritime Administrator Mark H. Buzby.

Since 2008, MARAD’s Small Shipyard Grant Program has awarded over $183 million to more than 180 small shipyards. These grants help fund the upgrades and expansions to empower this critical industry, allowing them to compete more effectively in a rapidly changing global marketplace. By providing the capital that will let shipyards increase their repair and production footprints these grants are helping to create more jobs throughout the country.

 

A complete list of grant recipients is below:

Catalyst Marine Engineering, Inc. in Seward, AK was awarded $400,097 to support the purchase of a Mach 500 water jet cutting system.

Master Boat Builders, Inc. in Bayou La Batre, AL was awarded $1,332,607 to support the purchase of a 182-ton capacity crawler, 55-ton mobile crane and a 30-ton rough terrain crane.

Marine Group Boat Works, LLC in Chula Vista, CA was awarded $392,037 to support the purchase of a CNC plasma table, 125-foot boom lift and a 33,000-pound forklift.

Patti Marine Enterprise, Inc. in Pensacola, FL was awarded $449,231 to support the purchase of a plasma cutting machine and iron worker.

Glasstech Corp. in Miami, FL was awarded $715,688 to support the purchase of a 165-ton marine travelift and a 65-ton vessel transporter.

Pacific Shipyards International in Honolulu, HI was awarded $731,159 in support of the purchase of a spray paint sandblast booth, hydraulic press with tooling, universal valve tester package with console and tooling, and four base plate mounted jibs.

National Maintenance and Repair, Inc. in Hartford, IL was awarded $217,538 to support the purchase of a plasma cutting system.

James Marine, Inc. dba Walker Boat Yard of Paducah, KY was awarded $1,125,000 to support the purchase of an 80-ton rough terrain crane.

Gravois Aluminum Boats, LLC in Jeanerette, LA was awarded $451,860 to support the purchase of an 80-ton rough terrain crane and welding equipment.

Bollinger Shipyards, Lockport LLC in Lockport, LA was awarded $521,753 to support the purchase of a lathe mill multi-task machine and a Python X Robotics CNC plasma cutting structural fabrication system.

Chesapeake Shipbuilding Corp. of Salisbury, MD was awarded $492,047 to support the purchase of four extending boom forklifts, a mobile crane and construction of larger mobile launching ways.

Washburn & Doughty Associates, Inc. in West Boothbay, ME was awarded $618,750 to support the purchase of robotic welding machines and a CNC lathe.

Front Street Shipyard in Belfast, ME was awarded $667,028 to support the purchase of a water jet cutting machine.

North Shore Marine Terminal & Logistics, Inc. in Escanaba, MI was awarded $713,468 in support of the modernization, safety and uptime improvements of material cutting and handling equipment.

SCF Services, Inc. in St. Louis, MO was awarded $489,917 in support of the purchase of a 110-ton crawler crane and employee skills training.

United States Marine, Inc. in Gulfport, MS was awarded $313,270 in support of the establishment of a lamination apprentice program and the purchase of a CNC core cutting machine and paint booth.

Jarrett Bay Boatworks, Inc. in Beaufort, NC was awarded $1,000,000 to support the purchase of a 300-ton marine travelift.

Bayonne Drydock and Repair Corp. in Bayonne, NJ was awarded $1,081,950 in support of the purchase of a CNC plasma table, brake press, plate roll, welding machines, iron worker, graving dock upgrades and hydroblast equipment.

Dorchester Shipyard, Inc. in Dorchester, NJ was awarded $232,585 in support of the purchase of two electric air compressor systems and electrical upgrades in the shipyard.

Ironhead Marine Inc. in Toledo, OH was awarded $768,500 to support the purchase of a 150-ton off-road crane.

Sause Bros. Inc. dba Southern Oregon Marine, Inc. in Coos Bay, OR was awarded $642,329 in support of the purchase of a mobile rough terrain crane, air compressors and a self-contained fabricated paint management system.

Metal Trades, Inc. in Hollywood, SC was awarded $520,167 to support the purchase of a kinetic heavy duty cutting and drilling machine.

Gulf Copper Dry Dock & Rig Repair in Galveston, TX was awarded $1,296,820 to support the construction of a 4,500-ton dry dock.

Glendale Boat Works, Inc. in Channelview, TX was awarded $1,064,654 to support the purchase of a 400-ton marine travelift.

Marine Hydraulics International, Inc. in Norfolk, VA was awarded $505,617 to support to the purchase of ten forklifts.

Snow and Company, Inc.  in Seattle, WA was awarded $67,511 to support the purchase of a Scotchman iron worker, Preston Eastin 2-axis weld positioner, engraving machine and four new welding machines.

Ice Floe, LLC dba Nichols Brother Boat Builders in Freeland, WA was awarded $1,312,500 to support the purchase of a 250-ton lattice boom crawler crane.

Fincantieri Marine Group LLC dba Fincantieri Bay Shipbuilding in Sturgeon Bay, WI was awarded $1,401,061 in support of the purchase and installation of four 50-ton overhead cranes.

Fraser Shipyard, Inc. in Superior, WI was awarded $500,738 to support the purchase of two self-propelled modular transporters and a high capacity forklift.

###

Read More...